The Ernie Jo Christmas Spectacular: Middle Way House Fundraiser

It’s the last day of November, can you believe it? We hope your NaNoWriMo projects are wrapping up smoothly. If you’ve fallen in love with any passages you wrote this month, send them our way, and we’ll share them!

The end of November also means it is officially the Christmas season. To begin celebrations, Inkblot Editing is taking part in the Ernie Jo Christmas Spectacular, a fundraiser for Middle Way House. As you know, Middle Way House is near and dear to our hearts here in Bloomington, so please consider joining us if you’re in the area. You can RSVP to the event here.

The evening will features some amazing musical acts, including an a cappella group with the best name ever: Resting Pitch Face.

You won’t want to miss it!erniejo

Prompts from the Interwebs

We’re more than halfway through NaNoWriMo, friends! Can you believe how fast this month has gone?

Here are some gems from the Internet to keep you writing.

Wilderness from Studiocanoe on Vimeo.

Happy weekend, everyone!

Thank You, Veterans!

Today, the United States remembers and thanks all veterans who have served this country. For those of us who have not served, memoirs are stirring and sobering first-person accounts of war. We’ve selected a few titles as recommended reading.

Though not a memoir, this collection of accounts is just as important, as it has been a neglected subject:

As we head into this weekend after a hard week, try to see the stories within the strangers around you.

Korean War veterans attend a Veterans Day ceremony aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. This year's ceremony was dedicated to America's Nisei, second-generation, U.S.-born Japanese-American soldiers who served during World War II in the 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Military Intelligence Service, and 1399th Engineer Construction Battalion. The ceremony signaled the opening of a special exhibit aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial honoring the service and bravery of America's Nisei soldiers. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)
Korean War veterans attend a Veterans Day ceremony aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. The 2013 ceremony was dedicated to America’s Nisei, second-generation, U.S.-born Japanese-American soldiers who served during World War II in the 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Military Intelligence Service, and 1399th Engineer Construction Battalion. The ceremony signaled the opening of a special exhibit aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial honoring the service and bravery of America’s Nisei soldiers. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

Chicago Manual of Style Q&A | November 2016

Every month, the Chicago Manual of Style folks answer questions they’ve received. Following are a couple excerpts from the Q&A of November 2016. To read the full month’s Q&A, visit www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/latest.html.


Q. Do I cite the transcript of a radio broadcast differently from the radio broadcast? I read the transcript and did not access the broadcast itself.

A. Yes—it’s important to cite the transcript if that’s where you got your information. Please see CMOS 14.277 (“Recordings of literature, lectures, and such”) for an example.

Q. I’m confused why there is a comma before “as well as” in 6.18, “The team fielded one Mazda, two Corvettes, and three Bugattis, as well as a battered Plymouth Belvedere.” If “as well as” was replaced with “and,” there would not be a comma. I can’t find anything else about this in the Manual. Can you please explain?

A. The comma tells us to read the Belvedere as an afterthought—it hints that the battered car is in a different league from the other cars. A search of the Manual for the phrase “as well as” reveals that it is sometimes introduced by a comma and sometimes not, depending on context and meaning.

NaNoWriMo Starts Today!

It’s here, friends! National Novel Writing Month is here! One difficult part of writing on your own is having no official deadline. That’s where NaNoWriMo comes in. They give you a goal and a deadline: write 50,000 words within the 30 days of November. Can you do it?

by Sienna Snow
by Sienna Snow

The folks over at NaNoWriMo have so many supports set up to help you reach your daily writing goals and achieve that ultimate goal of 50,000 words. You can even earn badges as you go along.

One great thing about NaNoWriMo is that you have to turn off your internal editor. Don’t worry about getting it perfect as you craft the sentence, just get the words out! You can fret about fixing them later. You’ll be amazed at how many more ideas flow when you leave editing until later.

So, who is in? If you’re participating in this awesome program, keep us updated! We’ll gladly share your work in progress or the passages you are especially proud of. Just sent it our way, to rachel@inkblotediting.com, subject line NaNoWriMo!